No Small Task for S.C. Cities Pipeline Expansion

Jan 24

No Small Task for S.C. Cities Pipeline Expansion

Residential neighborhoods in and nearby Charleston are in need of a reconditioned pipeline system. Due to natural causes such as fallen trees, roots, or simply the unavoidable signs of an aging system, cracks and breaks in the existing line have necessitated an overhaul. The Hickory Hollow project, which will replace nearly all of the existing sewer lines that run from Stone Road in South Hills, down the mountain along Ferry Branch creek, and end at the pump station near the Kanawha River. The Hickory Hollow project will install 6,400 feet of new pipe, ranging from 10 to 18 inches in diameter. Another 2,300 feet of specialized pipeline will be installed in areas where the existing pipe is intact. Fifty new manhole structures will be included.  When traveling in the area, you’ll notice ongoing construction near the Oakwood Road exit of US 119.  While several additional improvements have also been recommended for the area, the city is in the process of determining which improvements will be next in line. All told, the upgrades will include water and sewer service, drainage and detention upgrades, along with enhancements to nature trails and nearby parks. Bigger and better continues…The city of Greenville has been in the midst of the well-known, and roughly one-mile long sewer tunnel project. The tunnel is one of a kind as it is being built well underground-100 feet below. Downtown Greenville is preparing for the launch, which is anticipated to take place this year. The project known as Dig Greenville is a vast wastewater delivery system project that will, upon completion, stretch from Hudson Street to Cleveland Park. The designing phase is nearing its conclusion, allowing construction to begin later this year. The construction areas will be a staged near Cleveland Park and the Greenville Zoo.  The city advises that the major project will most likely be ongoing for the next few years. Public meetings will be planned in the near future to update residents on the progress and timeline of the new...

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Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Aug 18

Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Undoubtedly, you are still enjoying the many highlights that this time of year brings, but as the glory days of summer begin to wane, no worries! We’ve got some exciting events scheduled for you and they’re coming up right around the corner. Mark your calendars for these informative trade shows that you won’t want to miss! First up, Perma-Liner Industries is pleased to announce we’ll be in Milwaukee on September 12-13th for the WEQ Fair. This is the place to be to gain a world of knowledge about the trenchless pipelining Industry and the equipment Perma-liner Industries manufactures. You can expect to see our live demonstrations in the comfortable outdoor setting of the Wisconsin State Fair Park. This Wastewater Equipment Fair will have an assortment of commercial, industrial and municipal gear to become familiarized with and you’ll be intrigued to learn about the many systems used for sewer cleaning and rehabilitations. Interesting fact: did you know the Milwaukee Mile is a one-mile long oval race track located at Wisconsin State Fair Park? It’s the oldest operating motor speedway in the world. Next up! WEFTEC. Folks, this is the super bowl of trade shows. Not to be missed, and acclaimed as the largest annual water quality exhibition in the world. Also known for the most comprehensive show floor, this conference provides an unparalleled bird’s- eye view to the most cutting-edge technologies in the field. This is an event that will give you the chance to network with associates in the industry or just learn much more about the field of technology and water quality, treatments, equipment, and services. We’ll have our representatives there to answer questions, perform live demonstrations and provide resources to further your knowledge of the trenchless pipelining industry. Here’s the info to mark your calendars: The 89th Technical Exhibition and Conference is being held on Sept. 24- 28th at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. Interesting fact: The Convention Center has 1.1 million square feet of contiguous exhibit space and is the sixth largest convention facility in the nation. Stay tuned… we’ll have more information (on even more events) on deck, coming up soon! Looking forward to see you...

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The Chronicle of Anderson City’s Sewer System

Dec 01

The Chronicle of Anderson City’s Sewer System

The wastewater collection system in the City of Anderson most likely dates back the 1910’s or 1920’s. In the beginning, the first sewer collection and outfall lines directed sewer to the Rocky River and Whitner Creek with no treatment. In the 1930’s as all cities began to recognize that untreated wastewater discharge created health problems, the City purchased tracts of land to be the first wastewater treatment plants (WWTP’s) in the City of Anderson. One plant was constructed on the Rocky River in the Liberty Hill area. The other was built on Byrum Creek on the site that currently houses the Anderson County Animal Shelter. Both plants used primary treatment technology consisting of clarification and sludge removal. Each plant was rated for a discharge of approximately 1 million gallons per day (MGD). During the 1950’s and 1960’s, the United States government encouraged the prevention of pollution by providing funds for the construction of municipal water treatment plants, water pollution research, and technical training in treatment. In the 1960’s, the City leaders recognized the need of increased plant capacity and the better treatment of wastewater. The City purchased additional lands that would become the site of the present day, Generostee Creek and Rocky River WWTP’s. In 1965, the new secondary treatment plants were placed on line along with main sewer trunk line extensions. Each plant used state-of-the-art treatment technology as well as disinfection to treat wastewater prior discharge to the receiving streams. The Clean Water Act of 1972 was implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency so the foresight of the City leaders was well ahead of the curve. A signed agreement in 1987 between the City of Anderson and Anderson County set forth the intent of both parties to improve the wastewater treatment facilities of the...

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